Finance

Survey: US companies cut back sharply on hiring…

U.S. businesses sharply reduced hiring last month in a sign that the resurgent viral outbreak this summer slowed the economic recovery as many states closed parts of their economies again and consumers remained cautious about spending

Walmart is Making Some Big Changes

Walmart is receiving praise for its many big changes.

Deportivo player questioned by police after leaked audio

Spanish police have questioned a player who suggested in a leaked audio recording that his team may not play to win a rescheduled second-division match

CVS posts strong 2Q, with virus delaying elective…

CVS Health is reporting surprisingly strong second-quarter earnings as people postponed elective medical procedures during the pandemic

COVID-19: Vaccine Skeptics_Broadcast

As the medical community speeds towards the creation of a safe and effective vaccine, many Americans insist they would not feel safe taking one. A recent Associated Press poll revealed only 50% of Americans would agree to get one. We examine why such skepticism exists. Expert insight is offered by Dr. William Schaffner, Professor of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Dr. Kevin Schulman Professor of Medicine at the Clinical Excellence Research Center at Stanford and Dean Katherine Baicker, Emmett Dedmon Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy at Chicago University. Script:IN THE RACE FOR A CORONA VIRUS VACCINE, 2 US DRUG MAKERS ARE IN THE THIRD PHASE OF TESTING ... MEANING AN APPROVED VACCINE COULD BE A FEW SHORT MONTHS AWAY. Sot Dr. William Schaffner/ Professor of Preventive Medicine Vanderbilt University School of Medicine3:14 If everything goes as planned perhaps by the beginning of the next year by the beginning of 2021 we will have some information about how safe the vaccine is 3:24 HOWEVER, ACCORDING TO A RECENT POLITICO POLL NEARLY 60 PERCENT OF VOTERS SAY THE *TESTING* OF A VACCINE SHOULD BE THE PRIORITY... INCLUDING IF IT MEANS DELAYING THE ROLLOUT. AND EVEN IF A VACCINE IS AVAILABLE BY EARLY 2021, THE AMERICAN PUBLIC IS STILL SPLIT ON WHETHER OR NOT THEY WILL GET THE VACCINE...IN AN ASSOCIATED PRESS POLL ONLY 50 PERCENT SAID THEY WOULD. Sot Dr. Kevin Schulman Professor of Medicine, Clinical Excellence Research Center, Stanford6:46 I think the messaging to the American public has to be clear and consistent about the data what we know about the vaccine, how it has been tested, how that data has been evaluated, and we have to be transparent if we are going to build trust and get the adoption that we hope to have 7:06 AND IN A PEW POLL EARLIER THIS SPRING, NEARLY A THIRD OF YOUNG PEOPLE SAY THEY WOULDN'T GET A VACCINE... WHICH IS ESPECIALLY TROUBLING AS MILLENIALS ACCOUNT FOR INCREASING NUMBERS OF COVID CASES... Sot Katherine Baicker Emmett Dedmon Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy at Chicago University. 7:15 Once a vaccine is approved I hope that everyone takes it because we are all better off when the disease has nowhere to spread and individuals are better off when they are not susceptible to the disease 7:24ONE FEAR OF HEALTH OFFICIALS IS THAT THE ANTI VAXING COMMUNITY WILL USE THE GENERAL MISTRUST OF GOVERNMENT AND ITS HANDLING OF THE CORONAVIRUS AS A WAY TO SPREAD MISINFORMATION ... MEANING ANOTHER UPHILL BATTLE IN CONTAINING THE VIRUS.

N Carolina county joins Asheville with vote for reparations

A county in western North Carolina has joined the neighboring city of Asheville to apologize for its role in slavery and to take the rare step of supporting reparations for Black residents

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Ex-Trump adviser plans book on future of…

A key witness in President Donald Trump’s impeachment inquiry is going to be sharing her views about the future of a polarized America

COVID-19: Vaccine Skeptics

As the medical community speeds towards the creation of a safe and effective vaccine, many Americans insist they would not feel safe taking one. A recent Associated Press poll revealed only 50% of Americans would agree to get one. We examine why such skepticism exists. Expert insight is offered by Dr. William Schaffner, Professor of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Dr. Kevin Schulman Professor of Medicine at the Clinical Excellence Research Center at Stanford and Dean Katherine Baicker, Emmett Dedmon Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy at Chicago University.

Telemedicine provider Teladoc to spend $18.5B on…

One of the nation’s biggest telemedicine providers is spending more than $18 billion to stoke an approach to care that grew explosively during the pandemic and recently received an endorsement from President Donald Trump

The Benefits of Dark Chocolate

With the health benefits associated with chocolate, sometimes a snack can go a long way.

Biden campaign announces $280 million ad buy…

Joe Biden’s Democratic presidential campaign is reserving $280 million in digital and television ads through the fall

Running Out of Aluminum

Many chose to stock up on beer before the pandemic, causing a shortage in aluminum.

Ronald A. Primeau (1952-2020)

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Japan's Honda reports loss in April-June as virus…

Japanese automaker Honda says it sank into the red for the April-June as its sales plunged due to the coronavirus pandemic, especially in the U.S., Japan and India

Many Restaurants Are Closed for Good

Walmart is receiving praise for its many big changes.

BMW reports loss for 2nd quarter but sees rebound…

German carmaker BMW says it lost 212 million euros in the second quarter as the coronavirus pandemic shut down factories and dealerships

Jaime Harrison Update From The Trail - Subtitled

The Latest: Scottish city in lockdown after virus…

Lockdown restrictions have been reimposed in the Scottish city of Aberdeen after a coronavirus “cluster” was reported

Global shares up as investors monitor US stimulus…

Global stock markets are mostly higher as investors monitor U.S. talks on more stimulus spending and a U.S. trade pact with China

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Virgin Australia plans to shed staff under new US…

Virgin Australia plans to scale down its operations under new U.S. owners and shed a third of its staff as the airline adjusts to the pandemic